Quantum algorithm could help AI think faster

 

CQT's Jansen Zhao, Anupam Prakash and their collaborator present a  quantum speed-up for machine learning. One of the ways that computers ‘think’ is by analysing relationships within large sets of data. The team found a quantum algorithm for one such analysis that is faster than the classical approach and words for a wider array of data types than was previously expected. The team’s proposed ‘quantum linear system algorithm’ is published in the 2 February issue of Physical Review Letters.  In the future, it could help crunch numbers on problems as varied as commodities pricing, social networks and chemical structures.



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Read quantum flash fiction

 

Read the finalists in the Quantum Shorts flash fiction contest, organised by CQT with international media and scientific partners. Each story takes inspiration from quantum physics, is no more than 1000 words long, and includes the phrase “There are only two possibilities: yes or no”. The 18 shortlisted stories were selected from hundreds of entries. You can help someone get more reward for their writing: vote in the People’s Choice prize before 23:59 GMT on Thursday 15 February.



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Butterfly emerges from quantum simulation

 

Researchers at the Centre for Quantum Technologies have collaborated with the scientists building Google's quantum chips to simulate complex phenomena in physics. In a paper published 1 December in Science, they report simulations of the Hofstadter butterfly and many-body localisation.



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A national research centre of excellence

 

The Centre for Quantum Technologies was established as a national research centre of excellence in Singapore in 2007. We have over 150 scientists and students doing research into the foundations of quantum physics and the ways quantum physics enables new technologies. 



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Retrospective test for quantum computers can build trust

A team including CQT scientists offers improved schemes to check a quantum computation that's done in the cloud. "If you receive a result that look fishy, you can choose to verify the result, essentially retrospectively," says CQT's Joseph Fitzsimons. Their work is published in Physical Review Letters.

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CQT PhD student Anurag Anshu has been recognised for his research by the NUS School of Computing, winning the Dean's Graduate Research Excellence Award.

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A France-Singapore collaboration in quantum physics and quantum information has been renewed for five years. CQT is a partner in the research operation known as the UMI Majulab.

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Stretchy polymer makes good waveguides

CQT researchers have started building optical devices from an unexpected material: a polymer like that used to seal the edges of sinks. A big advantage is being able to tune the devices’ behaviour by simply stretching or bending the flexible material. “This research started out sounding like crazy talk and yet it worked,” says Alexander Ling, the groups’ Principal Investigator.

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Find us

Centre for Quantum Technologies, NUS
Science Drive 2 Block S15-03-18
Singapore 117543

cqtsec@nus.edu.sg
+65 6516 2818

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