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CQT Annual Symposium: THE FAMOUS, THE BIT AND THE QUANTUM

Date:

Wednesday, 7 December 2016, from 4.30pm.

This event is open to the public. It's free but registration is required. Please register here: CQT Annual Symposium 2016

Venue:
Auditorium 1
Level 1, Town Plaza
University Town, NUS
Location of the Auditorium can be found at: Google Map

Programme:

4.30pm

"The Quantum Approximate Optimization Algorithm: A Good Choice to Run on a Near Term Quantum Computer"
The Quantum Approximate Optimization Algorithm: A Good Choice to Run on a Near Term Quantum Computer
Edward Farhi
MIT, USA


Abstract:
I will describe a quantum algorithm for approximate optimization and explain how to analyze its performance on all instances of particular combinatorial optimization problems. I will explain why this algorithm is well suited to run on small scale quantum computers because of its low circuit depth and simple gate structure. I will also explain how, in principle, running this algorithm can demonstrate Quantum Supremacy because if a classical algorithm could efficiently sample its output then the Polynomial Hierarchy would collapse.


5.30pm: break


6.00pm

"From quantum philosophy to quantum technology "
From quantum philosophy to quantum technology
Markus Arndt
University of Vienna, Austria



Abstract:
Quantum physics has become one of the best confirmed scientific theories ever devised by mankind and it is firmly embedded in many modern technologies. The fact that quantum concepts often seem to contradict traditional notions of reality, space, time or logic has inspired fundamental philosophical debates as well as even further intriguing developments in quantum computing, communication, simulation, sensing and metrology. Based on a tutorial review of the state of the art in the field, we will focus on the concept of matter-waves, which was originally put forward by Louis de Broglie in 1923 “to solve almost all the problems brought up by quanta”, and cast in mathematical form by Erwin Schrödinger in 1926. We will see how modern matter-wave interferometry can serve in sophisticated tests of fundamental physics and as a subtle force sensor with many interdisciplinary applications.


7.00pm: End of Symposium


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